Manual The Raging Canal (The World On Wheels Book 1)

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This distorts history and pushes away a This was a long book that was weakened by a lack of analysis. This distorts history and pushes away a whole category of reader. Let us be honest about our history, but let us not wallow in a self-loathing which undercuts and distorts the remarkable achievements of Western civilization. Because of the lack of analysis I cannot give this book a strong general recommendation, but for those interested in maritime history it is a worthwhile edition to their library.

May 07, Doug Cornelius rated it it was ok Shelves: non-fiction , read-in , history.

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Lincoln Paine wants to change your view of the world. In his book, The Sea and Civilization , he makes that case that mankind's technological and social adaptation to the water has been a driving force in human history, whether it was to wage war, or for migration or commerce. Paine makes the case Lincoln Paine wants to change your view of the world. Paine makes the case by telling the tales of recorded history through the lens of the seas.

At times he succeeds. At other times, the book comes across as a rote recital of history. There were several places in the book where I wanted more insight. Paine is incredibly thorough, hitting most of the major events affected by sea travel.

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I wish there was more depth instead of breadth. On a positive note, I take my hat off to the author for the sheer amount of research he must have put into this. If you've ever wanted to know how much duty was charged to Persian ships calling at Indian ports in medieval times, this is the book for you. I confess I found it heavy going.

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It started well, with some interesting stuff about prehistoric sea travel; the voyages of the Polynesians etc; and I also enjoyed the last chapter, which covered themes like globalisation and the development of On a positive note, I take my hat off to the author for the sheer amount of research he must have put into this. It started well, with some interesting stuff about prehistoric sea travel; the voyages of the Polynesians etc; and I also enjoyed the last chapter, which covered themes like globalisation and the development of container ships and oil tankers.

At times though the rest of the book reminded me of the old fashioned geography textbooks in my s high school, which used to list the main exports of particular regions. Perhaps more importantly there seemed to be a dearth of analysis of all the factual data, which meant that at the end I didn't feel I had learned a great deal. Surprisingly enough, and despite the level of detail provided for some aspects, other areas seemed to be treated superficially or not mentioned at all.

The huge Atlantic slave trade is covered but with little or no analysis of its impact on Africa. In the section on WWI, the author rightly covers the German U-boat campaign, aimed at strangling supplies to Britain, but hardly mentions the British naval blockade of Germany, regarded by many historians as a significant factor in the Allied victory. I could go on, but you get my drift. Perhaps in the end the project was over-ambitious; the subject area simply too wide-ranging for the kind of detailed description attempted here.


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Glancing at the other reviews, I can see that most people have reviewed this more positively than I have, so maybe I am being too harsh. However this is a long voyage for the reader, and I can't say it was one I especially enjoyed. Jan 13, Sam Reaves rated it liked it.

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As a history buff I'm a sucker for big fat volumes that promise you the whole story in one place; I've plowed through H. I also love sea stories, so this doorstop tome was right up my alley. A maritime history of the world makes sense because our planet is mostly covered with water and very early on people discovered that large quantities of tradeable things were most easily shifted by floating them. So as people fanned o As a history buff I'm a sucker for big fat volumes that promise you the whole story in one place; I've plowed through H.

So as people fanned out across the world, much of the time they were on boats. Lincoln Paine's survey of maritime activity includes the major river systems and so manages to cover just about all the bases. There's a lot to keep track of; who knew there was so much going on in the Indian Ocean two thousand years ago?

There are a lot of silted-up harbors, sunken galleons and lost civilizations out there. But even if you have trouble keeping Shihr, Siraf and Saymur straight, seeing the epic of history through the lens of maritime traffic is an interesting slant on an old story. Apr 13, Wendell rated it it was amazing. One of the best history books I've read in years, Paine's splendidly written narrative account of humanity's relationship with the sea takes a genuinely global approach to its subject, a far cry from maritime history's traditionally Western orientation.

About two-thirds of the book takes place before the Columbian Exchange, allowing Paine to put the Indian Ocean in its proper place as the center of Eurasian maritime activity for a good two thousand years.

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As a result, the years of Western domina One of the best history books I've read in years, Paine's splendidly written narrative account of humanity's relationship with the sea takes a genuinely global approach to its subject, a far cry from maritime history's traditionally Western orientation. As a result, the years of Western dominance come across as a little dull in Paine's telling, but I expect that's because of their prior familiarity, at least to this reader. Livening up considerably by the end with an incisive look at the present state of global trade and maritime exchange, it was a book I was genuinely sorry to see end.

Jan 16, Jack Laschenski rated it it was amazing. An amazing history of the world from the point of view of ships and the merchants who built them. Starting about 5,BC folks traveled by the water in the Pacific and in Egypt. Trade was usually the goal. Exploration another. And in Egypt's case, transporting the stones for the pyramids. What did they build? How die they navigate? What was the effect on cultures? And how did trade develop into war? Apr 18, Peter Mcloughlin rated it really liked it Shelves: to , to , american-history , asian-history , european-history , bce-toce , to , world-history , to , The book is ok but too much is attempted in one volume.

The history of all maritime seafaring since the neolithic is going to be spread a little thin on detail. Not bad.

Appendix:Glossary of U.S. Navy slang - Wiktionary

Who would have thought an page maritime history of the world would sometimes be a slog to get through? Things really picked up f Who would have thought an page maritime history of the world would sometimes be a slog to get through? Things really picked up for me at the start of the European Age of Exploration, following the Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, and English in turn. Curiously, one of the most interesting parts of the book was the last one on the late 20th century. Container shipping has absolutely revolutionized modern commerce, yet it is almost completely unnoticed by most people.

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It is a background process; the days of port towns with sailors and merchants and porters is gone, for better or for worse. Anyway, good book! Jul 12, Ted Hillary rated it really liked it. A heavy but enjoyable read. Oct 09, Dave rated it it was ok.

It wasn't always smooth sailing, as a lot of the writing just skimmed the surface. Painfully dull at times. Funny that a "water based" book would be dry reading. Perhaps a magazine article would have sufficed? May 02, Don Trowden rated it it was amazing. This is a remarkable achievement, one that fascinated me for months but also one I had to read in small sections because it is so rich with information and I oftentimes read this book with Wikipedia open next to me.

Those side trips into Wikipedia oftentimes took me off into other ancient places of interest as the ancient names are not always the same as the modern. This was especially true for my favorite part of the book, the ancient Phoenician, Greek, Indian, and North African ports and civil This is a remarkable achievement, one that fascinated me for months but also one I had to read in small sections because it is so rich with information and I oftentimes read this book with Wikipedia open next to me.

This was especially true for my favorite part of the book, the ancient Phoenician, Greek, Indian, and North African ports and civilizations. One could construct a fabulous modern trip using this book as source material. The book tells the history of civilization from the earliest times to the present through the lens of maritime development.

That necessitates a good deal of information about boat and ship construction, which some might find of less interest, but it is in fact a core component of mankind's history of problem-solving. One of the great appeals is seeing how boats were being built by ancient peoples living at opposite ends of the globe, who arrived at some of the same or similar solutions. And trying to piece together from ancient discoveries many nmade in recent times how civilizations overlapped through distant travel and trade.